Commit 086819cd authored by Yadd's avatar Yadd
Browse files

Lemonldap::NG::Handler manpage update

parent 1e2d7415
......@@ -12,7 +12,8 @@ __END__
=head1 NAME
Lemonldap::NG::Handler - The Apache module part of Lemonldap::NG Web-SSO system.
Lemonldap::NG::Handler - The Apache protection module part of
Lemonldap::NG Web-SSO system.
=head1 SYNOPSIS
......@@ -35,7 +36,6 @@ Create your own package (example using a central configuration database):
dbiUser => "lemonldap",
dbiPassword => "password",
}
# Maximum time to load a local stored configuration
} );
=head2 Configure Apache
......@@ -71,10 +71,10 @@ It manages both authentication and authorization and provides headers for
accounting. So you can have a full AAA protection for your web space as
described below.
The Apache module part works both with Apache 1 and 2 ie mod_perl 1 and 2
The Apache module part works both with Apache 1.3.x and 2.x ie mod_perl 1 and 2
but B<not with mod_perl 1.99>.
=head2 Authentication, Autorization, Accounting
=head2 Authentication, Authorization, Accounting
=head3 B<Authentication>
......@@ -88,10 +88,10 @@ Lemonldap use session cookies generated by L<Apache::Session> so as secure as a
128-bit random cookie. You may use the C<securedCookie> options of
L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal> to avoid session hijacking.
You have to manage life of sessions by yourself since Lemonldap knows nothing
about the L<Apache::Session> module you've choosed, but it's very easy using a
simple cron script because L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal> stores the start time in the
C<_utime> field.
You have to manage life of sessions by yourself since Lemonldap::NG knows
nothing about the L<Apache::Session> module you've choosed, but it's very easy
using a simple cron script because L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal> stores the start
time in the C<_utime> field.
By default, a session stay 10 minutes in the local storage, so in the worth
case, a user is authorized 10 minutes after he lost his rights.
......@@ -106,7 +106,7 @@ about the way the user will choose. When configuring your Web-SSO, you have to:
authorization (see C<exportedHeaders> parameter in L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal>
documentation).
=item * create Perl expression to define user groups (using ldap attributes)
=item * create Perl expressions to define user groups (using ldap attributes)
=item * create an array foreach virtual host associating URI regular
expressions and Perl expressions to use to grant access.
......@@ -116,8 +116,8 @@ expressions and Perl expressions to use to grant access.
=head4 Example (See L<Lemonldap::NG::Manager> to see how configuration is
stored)
Exported variables (in Lemonldap::NG::Portal, will be stored in
configuration database):
Exported variables (values will be stored in session database by
L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal>):
exportedVars => {
cn => "cn",
......@@ -125,15 +125,15 @@ configuration database):
login => "uid",
},
User groups (stored in configuration database with L<Lemonldap::NG::Manager>):
User groups (values will be stored in session database by
L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal>):
groups => {
group1 => '{ $departmentUID eq "unit1" or $login = "xavier.guimard" }',
...
},
Area protection (stored in configuration database with
L<Lemonldap::NG::Manager>):
Area protection:
locationRules => {
www1.domain.com => {
......@@ -150,17 +150,19 @@ L<Lemonldap::NG::Manager>):
=head4 Performance
You can use Perl expressions as complicated as you want and you can use all
the exported LDAP attributes (and create your own attributes: see examples in
L<Lemonldap::NG::Portal> distribution) both in groups evaluations and area
protections (you just have to call them with a "$").
the exported LDAP attributes (and create your own attributes: with 'macros'
mechanism. See L<Lemonldap::NG::Manager>) in groups evaluations, area
protections or custom HTTP headers (you just have to call them with a "$").
You have to be careful when choosing your expressions:
=over
=item * C<groups> are evaluated each time a user is redirected to the portal,
=item * C<groups> and C<macros> are evaluated each time a user is redirected to
the portal,
=item * C<locationRules> are evaluated for each request.
=item * C<locationRules> and C<exportedheaders> are evaluated for each request
on a protected area.
=back
......@@ -173,8 +175,8 @@ evaluate a long expression at each HTTP request:
},
},
You can also use ldap filters in C<groups> parameter, or Perl expression or
mixed expressions. Perl expressions has to be enclosed with C<{}>:
You can also use LDAP filters, or Perl expression or mixed expressions in
C<groups> parameter. Perl expressions has to be enclosed with C<{}>:
=over
......@@ -200,23 +202,24 @@ was wrong if C<process> method has failed.
=head4 I<Logging application access>
Because an handler knows nothing about the protected application, it can't do
more than logging URL. As Apache does this fine, L<Lemonldap::NG::Handler> gives it
the name to used in logs. The C<whatToTrace> parameters indicates which
variable Apache has to use (C<$uid> by default).
more than logging URL. As Apache does this fine, L<Lemonldap::NG::Handler>
gives it the name to used in logs. The C<whatToTrace> parameters indicates
which variable Apache has to use (C<$uid> by default).
The real accounting has to be done by the application itself which knows the
result of SQL transaction for example.
Lemonldap can export http headers either using a proxy or protecting directly
the application. By default, the C<User-Auth> field is used but you can change
it using the C<exportedHeaders> parameters (stored in the configuration
database). This parameters contains an associative array:
Lemonldap::NG can export HTTP headers either using a proxy or protecting
directly the application. By default, the C<Auth-User> field is used but you
can change it using the C<exportedHeaders> parameters (stored in the
configuration database). This parameters contains an associative array per
virtual host:
=over
=item * B<keys> are the names of the choosen headers
=item * B<values> are perl expressions where you can use user datas stored in
=item * B<values> are Perl expressions where you can use user datas stored in
the global store by calling them C<$E<lt>varnameE<gt>>.
=back
......@@ -230,10 +233,11 @@ Example:
},
www2.domain.com => {
'Authorization' => '"Basic ".encode_base64($employeeNumber.":dummy")',
'Remote-IP' => '$ip',
},
}
=head2 Storage systems
=head2 Session storage systems
Lemonldap::NG use 3 levels of cache for authenticated users:
......@@ -244,17 +248,17 @@ parameter (completed with C<globalStorageOptions>) and used by
L<lemonldap::NG::Portal> to store authenticated user parameters,
=item * a L<Cache::Cache> module choosed with the C<localStorage> parameter
(completed with C<localStorageOptions> and used to share authenticated users
(completed with C<localStorageOptions>) and used to share authenticated users
between Apache's threads or processus and of course between virtual hosts,
=item * Lemonldap::NG variables: if the same user use the same thread or
processus a second time, no request are needed to grant or refuse access. This
is very efficient with HTTP/1.1 Keep-Alive system.
=item * Lemonldap::NG::Handler variables: if the same user use the same thread
or processus a second time, no request are needed to grant or refuse access.
This is very efficient with HTTP/1.1 Keep-Alive system.
=back
So the number of request to the central storage is limited to 1 per user each
10 minutes.
So the number of request to the central storage is limited to 1 per active
user each 10 minutes.
Lemonldap::NG is very fast, but you can increase performance using a
L<Cache::Cache> module that does not use disk access.
......
......@@ -2,7 +2,6 @@ package Lemonldap::NG::Handler::SharedConf::DBI;
use strict;
use UNIVERSAL qw(can);
use Lemonldap::NG::Handler::SharedConf qw(:all);
use DBI;
use Storable qw(thaw);
......
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